COMBE MARTIN SILVER MINE
                     
                      ( research & preservation society)

  
TIME LINE OF MINING ACTIVITY IN COMBMARTIN
1292 





FIRST DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE OF ROYAL MINE AT COMBMARTIN.
1320
KING EDWARD 111 SENDS MINERS TO COMBMARTIN FROM SOUTH PENNINES.
1400'S
HENRY V CONTINUES TO WORK THE MINES FOR 'THE BETTERMENT OF HIS WARS IN FRANCE'.
1520'S
KING HENRY V111 APPOINTS GERMAN MINING ENGINEER JOACHIM HOCHSTETTER TO WORK IN COMBMARTIN AND DEVON 
'WITH A THOUSAND MEN AT HIS COMMAND'
1587
BEVIS BULMER, MINING ENGINEER, EXPLOITS RICH WORKINGS KNOWN AS FAYES MINE. TWO SILVER ROSE BOWLS CRAFTED FROM THE LAST PLATE OF SILVER.
1640'S
THOMAS BUSHELL, MINING ENTREPRENUER, DRIVES DEEP ADIT UNDER OLD WORKINGS, ROYAL MINT ESTABLISHED IN COMBMARTIN DURING CIVIL WAR?
1700'S
YEARS OF DECLINE AND ABANDONMENT OF MINES.
1796
RENEWED ACTIVITY, 9000 TONS OF IRON AND SILVER ORE SENT TO SOUTH WALES FOR SMELTING.
1840'S
JOHN WILLIAMS, PUMPING ENGINEER, SINKS WILLIAMS SHAFT AND INTRODUCES STEAM ENGINE TO PUMP OUT WATER AND EXTEND WORKINGS AROUND MINE TENEMENT.
1876
ANCIENT WORKINGS, (POSSIBLY FAYES MINE) REOPENS AS HARRIS'S SHAFT FOR THE EXTRACTION OF ZINC. LAST MINE CAPTAIN, JOHN COMER.






  
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Timeline part 1
Timeline part 2
Timeline part 3
Timeline part 4
  1880
  COMBMARTIN MINE CLOSES, MINE TENEMENT    ABANDONED AS ECONOMICALLY UNVIABLE.
 1988
  A GROUP OF MINING ENTHUSIASTS BEGIN TO
  UNCOVER  THE REMAINS LEFT ON MINE TENEMENT.
  2001 COMBE MARTIN SILVER MINES RESEARCH AND        PRESERVATION SOCIETY IS FORMED TO PRESERVE AND      RESEARCH WHAT IS LEFT OF THE SITE.

 
Thursday 4th September 1845. North Devon Journal.

COMBMARTIN - Accident - An Inquest was held at Combmartin, on Saturday last, before Richard Bremridge Esq, Coroner, on the body of AARON HAYMAN,a child of four years of age, the son of a blacksmith of that parish, who, the morning before, was sent by his mother to purchase a little tobacco to take to his father, who was at work in the mines; he was not missed until the evening, when his cap was seen floating on the pond adjoining the counting-house of the Mine Tenement, and the water being let off, the body of the deceased was found quite dead. There was no evidence to show how the deceased came to be in the water, but the most probable conjecture was that he had gone too near the edge of the pond and had fallen in. A verdict of "Found Drowned" was returned.

Bevis Bulmer

Thomas Bushell

Dr John Dee
























photos of the Gilbert/Edes spoon by courtesy of The Royal Albert Memorial Museum
(RAMM) (Exeter)